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Course Content and Outcome Guide for RET 141

Date: 06/14/12

Posted by: Curriculum Office

Course Number: RET 141
Course Title: Electrical Motor/Generator Control

Transcript Title:  Electr Motor / Generator Control
Credit Hours: 5
Lecture Hours: 40

Lecture / Lab Hours:

Lab Hours: 30

Prereqs:  EET 112 

Grading Options:

Special Fee:

Course Description:

Examines electrical circuits, electromagnetism, AC and DC electrical theory, industrial sensors, voltage and relays, motor controls, AC and DC motors and generators, and power distribution systems. Prerequisite: EET 112.

Course Outcomes:

1. Apply principles of logical thought and safety when working with electricity, electronics, and
mechanical systems.
2. Use motor and generator controls for the operation of wind turbines.
3. Use electrical and mechanical theory when maintaining and repairing wind turbine generators and towers.
4. Distinguish between single and three phase power, and how these apply to the power industry.
5. Follow manufacturers’ specifications when maintaining and repairing wind turbines.
6. Operate AC and DC motors and generators.
7. Measure the performance of AC and DC motors and generators.
8. Identify faults in AC and DC motors and generators.


Outcome Assessment Strategies:

Assessment methods are to be determined by the instructor. Typically, in class exams and quizzes along with homework assignments are used. Lab work is typically assessed by informal and formal lab reports, oral presentation, and possibly a lab exam.  Evaluation is by unit exams, homework, and a comprehensive final exam.

Text & Materials:  (suggested and/or required)

Course Activities & Design:

Lecture and discussion are the instructional methods used. Weekly homework is assigned. Laboratory activity includes building circuits on solderless circuit boards, electrical boards, making circuit measurements using test equipment, and electrical trades equipment, analyzing test data, and comparing to predictions using theory.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues, and Skills):

1.0 ELECTRICAL DIAGRAMMING SKILLS Instructional Goal: To introduce the symbols and concepts used to describe electrical circuits.

Objectives:

  • Learn to draw electrical circuits using standard symbols. These are known as schematic diagrams.
  • Learn to draw electrical circuits using One-line, Line and Ladder diagrams.
  • Learn and practice skills in creating several types of electrical diagram and electronic schematic drawings.
  • Learn and practice skills in reading several types of electrical diagram and electronic schematic drawings.
  • Learn rules of line diagrams; load, control, switch, numbering systems, signals, decisions, actions, logic functions, memory, common circuits and component symbols.

2.0 Magnetism and Motion, DC Instructional Goal: To introduce magnetic fields, solenoids, DC motors, and DC generators.

Objectives:

  • Be able to describe the characteristics and causes of magnetic fields.
  • Be able to describe the Hysteresis curve and how it applies to relays and motors.
  • Be able to identify control mechanisms for relays and DC motors.
  • Be able to draw a control circuit, and identify the proper components to use in the circuit.
  • Describe the operation and construction of a DC generator and motors.
  • Describe the various types and characteristics of DC generators and motors.
  • Be able to identify types of DC motors and their characteristic torque curve.
  • Describe the operation and construction of a DC motor.
  • Be able to connect a DC motor to a source by understanding the standard motor connections.

3.0 AC generators, transformers, and motors. Instructional Goal: To introduce the concepts of AC solenoids, transformers, generators, and motors.

Objectives:

  • Be able to describe the characteristics and causes of an AC magnetic field.
  • Be able to describe the operation and construction of common types of AC generators and motors.
  • Be able to describe what a shading coil is and what it is used for.
  • Be able to identify control mechanisms for relays, AC generators, and AC motors.
  • Be able to draw a control circuit, and identify the proper components to use in the circuit.
  • Be able to identify types of AC motors and their characteristic torque curve.
  • Be able to connect an AC motor to a source.
  • Be able to analyze the operation and characteristics of circuit protection devices.
  • Describe transformer operation and standard connections.
  • Describe Delta and Wye operation and connections of an AC motor and generator.
  • Determine the differences between single phase, three phase, and the different voltages transformers create.
  • Troubleshoot motors and generators.

4.0 Contactors and Motor Starters Instructional Goal: To explore types of switching used to control motors and generators.

Objectives:

  • Describe the problems associated with switching high current devices and describe solutions to the problems.
  • Describe common types of contactors, their construction, protection ratings, operation, and use.
  • Draw line diagrams for contactor circuits.
  • Recognize common types of contactors and the connections on the contactors and implement them in a control circuit.
  • Describe problems and solutions using AC and DC contacts.
  • Describe common types of overload relays and their construction and use.
  • Select for use, identify, and size control switches.
  • Understand theory and use of common control switches and associated wiring diagrams.
  • Troubleshoot control devices.

5.0 Control Devices, Reversing Motor Circuits Instructional Goal: To introduce concepts of motor reversing control circuits.

Objectives:

  • Understand, identify, and create motor reversing circuits from common components.
  • Understand operation and construction of motor reversing controls.
  • Understand Control and motor connections.
  • Identify and understand operation and construction of common types of reversing motor switches.
  • Understand Start, Stop, forward and reverse jogging circuits.
  • Understand motor control wiring methods, and wiring diagrams.
  • Troubleshoot reversing motor control circuits.

6.0 Relays and Solid State Starters Instructional Goal: To introduce Relays and solid state starters.

Objectives:

  • Describe and use common types of solid state relays, their construction, theory of operation and technical specifications.
  • Describe and use common types of general purpose electromechanical relays, their construction, use, theory of operation, circuit diagrams, and troubleshooting.
  • Understand troubleshooting problems associated with electromechanical and solid state relays.

7.0 SERIES – Power distribution systems Instructional Goal: To understand the power companies role in power generation and transmission, and determine the common voltage sources associated with power distribution systems.

Objectives:

  • Describe the power generation and transmission system.
  • Describe the components of a substation and read the electrical diagrams that describe it.
  • Understand the differences between the different voltages common to industrial installations.
  • Understand the voltages on high tension power lines, transformers, and power lines, and how they are created and used.
  • Understand phase connections and Delta and Wye connections.
  • Understand transformers connected for Delta and Wye distribution systems.
  • Understand three phase and balancing loads.
  • Understand the purpose of all the components of a power system.
  • Understand switchboards, busways, feeders, and troubleshooting devices found inside a substation.
  • Understand and describe the connection between an electric generation utility and the power grid.

8.0 High power solid state devices Instructional Goal: Introduce high power solid state devices, common sensors and control devices.

Objectives:

  • Understand theory and use of diodes in power transmission and motor control.
  • Understand theory and use of the silicon controlled rectifier in power transmission and motor control.
  • Understand industrial timers and counters.
  • Understand electrical diagrams of timers, counters, SCR’s and diodes.
  • Understand the use of common industrial sensors.
  • Understand the conditions for mounting sensors in an industrial environment.

9.0 Reduced voltage starting Instructional Goal: Introduce methods of starting electric motors and solving related current surges.

Objectives:

  • Determine load torque and starting requirements for single phase and 3 phase electric motors.
  • Be able to read motor characteristic charts.
  • Determine common methods of starting motors using reduced voltage methods such as primary resistor, autotransformer, part winding, wye and delta. Use solid state switches such as SCR, triacs, alternistors, soft starters.
  • Read electrical motor diagrams.
  • Determine which starting method is best for a given situation.
  • Troubleshoot starting circuits.

10.0 Motor speed control, acceleration and deceleration methods Instructional Goal:
Introduce methods of controlling motor speed and motor braking.

Objectives:

  • Implement and describe common methods of motor braking: friction brake pads, plugging, DC injection braking, and dynamic braking.
  • Calculate torque, locked rotor torque, pull up torque, breakdown torque, full load torque and braking torque of a motor.
  • Determine the speed control scheme for common types of motors with respect to the kind of load it will drive.
  • Calculate motor horsepower, and understand the relationship between speed, horsepower and torque.

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